The Airstream Diary | Airstream Repair | Airstream Living

Airstream Trailer Living and Repair

Work Gets in the Way of Work

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Ahhhhhhh! I forgot and left the Airstream home alone (actually at A&P’s) for 45 days!

Finally made it back out to Cottondale, Texas, today. It’s been so long I may have to remind you that is where the Safari 23 resides, among many more Airstreams at A&P Vintage Trailer Repair, aka. Ann & Paul’s.

I described the feeling to Ann as what I would imagine a parent to feel when they look up two months later, and remember they forgot to pick their kid up at school. You hope they are still there.It felt like the inanimate Airstream was a little upset being left out there in the rain, wind and hail. Thank goodness we have so little of all of those in North Texas these days. Global something, you know.

As many steps as we made forward before the work hiatus (when I actually went to work), I also took a couple of steps back, and they feel like they were knee-deep into mud. First, the angle iron (custom bent as you recall) that runs along the back wall – sandwiched between the wall and U channel – had to be cut out with the plasma cutter. It didn’t line up properly AND I had already sandwiched the bottom of the angle between the floor and the frame with liberal amounts of that bonding calk. Done, cut out and gone. SECOND, the perfectly straight runners that go underneath along the outriggers (they are where the belly pan and outside wall panels curve under, meet and get riveted), no longer line up the same distance in as they did on the original frame. Rather than cut those out, I ordered a whole new run of them, and they will run doublewide down the length of both sides of the trailer. None of that would be a big deal, but I am the guy who hates rust. That means everything that has been cut out was already painted – well painted. That means I now have to paint the runners, crawl around on the ground with a welder, and act like a weldor again. I hoped I was done with that, but NOooo.

On the cooler side, I did order our new Dometic air conditioner today. We went for the biggest they have, since it is Texas after all. I should have that in a couple of days.

The checklist gets longer not shorter now.

There’s still the sheet of plywood that supports the freshwater tank. Somebody remind me why I threw the old one away. It’s a funny thing. This sheet of plywood really needs to be bullet proof. It covers a huge area of the bottom of the trailer, is exposed to all the elements we will be navigating (think Stony Pass water crossings), and it supports a lot of weight. What a recipe. The original wasn’t in too good a shape, but it did appear to have the sheet of aluminum adhered to it quite well – almost like another layer of plywood veneer! So, I have to bomb-proof that piece of plywood.

We also have a buckle in the marmoleum flooring that runs in a visible spot. The floor laid out fine before we dropped the shell back on it, but now with heat (or whatever) it is a serious problem. It looks like we will have to cut a splice in the marmoleum, gather and glue it.

NOTE – Just to give you guys the heads-up, I am about to pump some serious energy into this website. You will notice a “Instagram” photo in the sidebar, and a twitter feed as well. I have put off really “plugging in” this site until I was ready to deal with what it means for readers and traffic here. If you ever see anything you don’t like, let me know. I AM ALSO MAKING IT EASIER TO COMMENT on this site. You can comment and ask questions without having to register or login. Your comment will be held for approval, but that’s only prudent.

I am also undertaking the redesign of Ann & Paul’s site this summer. So keep your eyes on www.apvintagetrailerworks.com in coming weeks.

Airstream Axles – This is How You Roll

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The axle is waiting and ready for the install on our Airstream Safari frame. It’s going to be a 35-degree which gives about 1.5 inches more height than the 22-degree. This Airstream axle is made by Rockwell, and you can purchase them through A&P Vintage Trailer in Cottondale, Texas. Paul can have these ready and waiting in about four days.

Original 1970 Airstream Safari Axle

As you can see, this is a  major and extremely necessary upgrade for most restorations of vintage Airstream Trailers. Axles are your connection to the ground, and the ground is what stops you, right? I also opted for the disc brakes (and controller), which should have the Safari stopping on dimes and giving change.

New Replacement Axle for Airstream Safari with Disc Brakes

I finished all the welding of the frame yesterday, so now my painter will be coming in to paint the frame with a topcoat (it’s primed) after the axle is on (allowing me to move the frame away from other trailers), and I have sand blasted and primed a couple of other spots. There’s only a token amount of old frame remaining on the Safari – from just behind the axle plates forward, and the total long distance replaced came out to something like 80-inches. That’s almost entirely boxed as well. Add the custom cross members, and you get the picture.