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A Short Day at A&P Vintage

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We put in a short day at A&P Vintage just because the work didn’t time out with the daylight. It’s not like we were tired from yesterday’s work, or anything like that!

Leslie and Anne took a look at colors for the Airstream’s new Marmoleum floor and Multispec by Multi Color Specialties, Inc. (resembles original Airstream zolatone). There’s still plenty of hard design decisions to be made above deck, but the path is set for everything happening below the Airstream’s marine grade plywood flooring. While they were talking, I managed to finish the edge painting of the ply wood and covered known wet areas (specifically the doorway and bathroom area) with a coat of paint just to have a shot at beading water instead of absorbing it.

One thing I had forgotten about, and really hadn’t decided, was where to put the spare Airstream’s spare tire carrier. It didn’t come with one, and there was no place for one evident in the old configuration of the Safari ’23. So, while we are in so deep, I decided to put a standard Airstream spare tire carrier that mounts between the main rails just behind the tongue – up and under the floor. That means leaving off a section of belly pan / insulation, and laying a sheet of aluminum below the marine grade plywood and sandwiched against the frame and the ply wood. We will lose some R value right there, but the ability to carry a spare up and out of the way is well worth another tradeoff.

It is amazing how much more real the project looks with pieces of plywood decking fitted neatly and almost puzzle perfect atop the frame. Now the frame begins to disappear, a time capsule for someone else to unwrap and say, “We can do so much better with today’s materials and technology. Bring in the magnetic levitation axle, and activate hail forcefield, ” in about a hundred years.

Earlier, I mentioned the possibility of the Airstream wheel wells being off, way off. I took one of the old ones (never throw your old wheel wells away until the new ones are completely installed)out to compare to the new ones that I left in Cottondale yesterday. For my money, in mymind’s eye, they were exactly the same, but Paul had a heck of a time with the ones I had made for a ’63 Safari that we assumed would be the same. It turns out my Airstream wheel wells are an exact match to my Airstream (1970 Safari), but not even in the ballpark for the ’63. Such is the Airstream life. I breathed a sigh of relief, and knew that the wheel wells wouldn’t be costing us any extra time.

On the other side of the design spectrum, apparently the best way to lay down these full sheets of Marmoleum is to lay it directly on the deck before we drop the fuselage back onto the deck – sandwiching the edges under the Airstream’s U channel support / bolt down strip.  That makes for a clean install, and still stays true to floating the flooring (allowing for expansion and contraction of the surface).

Below is a good look at the wheel wells, and how they meet with the decking. It may take some adjusting, and further notching inside the wheel well decking, but remember the very outer edge of the well (where it meets the deck) is flush with the deck. Those little tabs running over the top are for securing the inner skin with rivets. If you have problems here, don’t fret! Much of this will disappear beneath a lot of further construction.

 

airstream wheel well

Decking is just laying on flange of wheel well here. If you get this tight of fit, you are doing great. Otherwise you may have to trim back the decking to make everything line up.

 

 

airstream wheel well replacement

Note how I folded down the tab on the piece that is below deck. If your wells look like this, do the same.

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